Picture
                    (c) by John Ashley Photography

Contained within the church of Upper Sheringham are many memorials to the Upcher Family of Sheringham Park. Abbot Upcher bought the sheringham estate in 1811. The agent who sold the estate to them was William Repton, who introduced the Upchers to his father Humphry Repton a foremost landscape designer in the country. 

So it was that Abbott and Charlotte Upcher commissioned Repton to design the park and one of his sons to design the hall. The first stone of the hall was laid in 1813 and Abbot Upcher noted in his diary 'that it was the hardest winter known in England for many years'.

Humphry Repton who was in his sixties at the time of the commission considered Sheringham Park with its magnificent rhododendron and azalea displays, to be 'his favourite and darling child in Norfolk'. His designs for the park still exist in one of Reptons 'Red Books'. He used a separate flap to overlay the full design to show the before and after view of the park. Unfortunately Abbott Upcher did not live to see the completion of his work as he died in 1819 at the age of 35. The estate was inherited by his eldest son, Henry Ramey who was only 9 years old. The estate eventually passed into the hands of the National Trust in 1986.

In the church the memorial to Abbott Upcher shows his wife Charlotte weeping over a fallen column, with a piece of tree clutched in her hand. The memorial was sculptured by John Bacon and Samuel Manning and is an early example of the many works they produced in their partnership. The mausoleum for the Upcher family rests behind the memorial. Charlotte Upcher was responsible for the first lifeboat given to the people of Sheringham, which was launched on 14th November 1838.  

She named the boat 'Augusta' after her youngest daughter who died on September 15th 1836 aged only 20. 
There is an image of Augusta Upcher in one of the stained glass windows as you enter the church on the right hand side.
 Picture (c) by John Ashley Photography